Thursday, August 2, 2018

Triangle of Hope by Michael Meyer


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Contemporary Fiction
Date Published: December 1, 2014
Publisher: Pacific Books

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If one person can make a difference, just think what three can do.

Clint Westerly was a success until a fateful choice he makes tears his world all apart. Tanya Wilshire is broke but hell-bent on committing to her mother's final deathbed request. 84-year-old Seamus Harrington needs to right an ancient wrong before time runs out.

Filled with grit and determination, these three people with three different problems, an unlikely trio of unexpected allies, converge in a small Irish town to form a Triangle of Hope against all odds. Together they take a courageous stand that will forever change their world and that around them.


Praise

If you love feel-good reads with happy endings, then TRIANGLE OF HOPE is for you. "If an author can make you cry for his characters then want to hug them close and then want to do an Irish Jig with them to celebrate overcoming that much pain then you know you have read a book that will stay with you forever."- Wanda Hartzenberg, Wanda's Amazing Amazon Reviewers

It is a "fantastic read that will pull at your heart." - Lauren Alumbaugh, Goodreads librarian

SEMIFINALIST FOR THE 2015 KINDLE BOOK AWARD IN LITERARY FICTION

Excerpt 2
The parish priest of Gailemore was the first to do so. It was the crux of his sermon that Sunday. His words and actions were quickly taken up elsewhere. First Galway City, then Dublin, then all over the Emerald Isle. With its story so widely known already throughout the world, clerics worldwide began citing the story of Gailemore as a classic example of how the back of injustice can and should be broken. It was the duty of every human to see this done.
“Imagine! All it takes is love,” they said. “And the will of the people. Beginning with just one man or one woman—or both.”  This was heard in churches, synagogues, mosques—everywhere people went to pray for peace in the world. Peace in their time. It could be had. If Gailemore can do it, so can I, and so can you became the oft-heard chant.

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On her good days Tanya was able to get about. On her bad, she stayed put, but she was always surrounded by those who cared deeply for her and she for them. She loved the plaque majestically standing on the plot of land where her mother had been born, and she was in awe of the power she felt when she entered The Misunderstanding Museum for the very first time.
“I love this place,” she said, and her words were clearly understood by all who heard them leave her lips: she meant both the museum itself and the little village of Gailemore. There was simply no denying that.
Afterwards, back in the pub, she made Clint promise to have her own ashes strewn among her mother’s, in beautiful Galway Bay, and he assured her that he would, but he also told her to be patient and to hold her horses. “You’ve still got a lot of good living to do,” he told her.
Life was wonderful once again. Just to be alive was something to be cherished. As were the times that the three friends spent with one another, sharing life with one another and with their new friends, the villagers of Gailemore.
Just yesterday, as they sat together in the pub, Clint was heard to say, “We have a very interesting phenomenon here. Three lost souls, who came together to save each other. And we have, each of us, in one way or another.”
“True,” said Seamus Harrington. “Very true at that.”
Clint nodded. “I’d say we are like blood brothers.”
“And sister,” Tanya said.
Seamus set his half-full pint of Guinness on the table. “Kin,” he said. “We’re now like blood kin.”
Tanya nodded her head up and down in agreement. “I like that!”
“But it’s even more than that,” Clint said, “much more. We’re like the trio of five-leaf clovers in the grass of Seamus’ Lookout Cove. We’re bound together now, like an unbreakable triangle, a triangle of hope. It’s simply amazing what we have accomplished together in the short time we have known each other. For ourselves, and for so many others.”
“True, true, ah so true!” replied Seamus Harrington.
The fiddler, sitting nearby, overhearing this, began fiddling Amazing Grace, which brought all talk in the pub to a halt as the amazing tune floated its way from wall to wall, bouncing up and down and all around like a magical wand.
And so it was in the little corner of the world known as the village of Gailemore.







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About the Author

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Michael Meyer is the author of mysteries, thrillers, humorous fiction, and non-fiction: Love and romance, laughter and tears, thrills and fears.
As a recent retiree from a forty-year career as a professor of writing, he now lives in Southern California wine country with his wife, Kitty, and their two adorable rescue cats.







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